The Wishing Stone (The Eve Project, book 2) – a Review

How far would you go for love? What would you do to bring the one you loved back from the dead? If you did bring someone back, would this person still be the same? Would this person’s personality be any different? All of this raises the question: is it morally right to play God?

The Wishing StoneKate and Roger had a wishing stone, a stone that you could gently rub three times, make a wish, and have your wish come true. So what could go wrong? They could have anything they wanted, right? Well, not so much. Kate died of cervical cancer. The wishing stone couldn’t keep her alive.  After Kate’s death, her brother Ben no longer believed in magic.

Ben, Kate’s brother has his own condition to deal with—bio-chemical electrical discharge. Because of this condition, he can’t be around unshielded electronics or they sort of catch on fire. Roger, Ben’s brother-in-law, is Kate’s husband. He made Ben inhibitors to wear that would keep his bio-chemical electrical discharge under control, but these fail so much that it is worrisome.

Roger wants Ben to go to him at his research facility, Warwick, so he can help him out. He figures that he will only spend a few days there, but when does anything turn out like we expect it to?

Reading about Ben’s time at the facility, what they had already done, and what they could do, was fascinating. What Ben discovers there frightens, disgusts, and surprises him. How far would you go for love? What would you do to bring the one you loved back from the dead? If you did bring someone back, would this person still be the same? Would this person’s personality be any different? All of this raises the question: is it morally right to play God? This series has the potential to turn into the story of a modern-day Frankenstein.

I wonder, is the technology talked about in the book in use anywhere in the world? Hmm. If not, I wonder how long it will be before someone tries it.

If you are a science fiction fan, this book by Tegon Maus is one you don’t want to miss. I was sent a copy in exchange for an honest review. If you would like to purchase this book, I have provided an Amazon link below.

Amazon Link: The Wishing Stone (The Eve Project, book 2)

Recommended Articles: 
Machines of the Little People – a Review
Bio-Chemical Electrical Discharge – Guest Post by Tegon Maus
Service Before Self – a Review
Write What You Know & The Devil is in the Details – Guest Post by Tegon Maus

Favorite Sentences:
It was the last time I believed in magic, in love or the existence of God.

Left with little or no dignity, I was no longer a person, but just a specimen, a genetic curiosity.

I screamed in agony as my flesh was seared, sending up small columns of smoke and the stench of burning flesh.

If we have a better chance at life, why not take it?

I worried about her feelings, even though I knew deep inside she was nothing more than a machine.

New Words Learned:
jamb – a side post or surface of a doorway, window, or fireplace

parapet – a low, protective wall along the edge of a roof, bridge, or balcony

protonic – (chem) (of a solvent, such as water) able to donate hydrogen ions to solute molecules

About the Author, Tegon Maus:
Tegon MausI was raised pretty much the same as everyone else… devoted mother, strict father, and all the imaginary friends I could conjure. Not that I wasn’t friendly, I just wasn’t “people orientated.” Maybe I lived in my head way more than I should have, maybe not. I liked machines more than people, at least I did until I met my wife.

The first thing I can remember writing was for her. For the life of me, I can’t remember what it was about… something about dust bunnies under the bed and monsters in my closet. It must have been pretty good because she married me shortly after that. I spent a good number of years after following a variety of ideas before I got back to writing.

It wasn’t a deliberate conscious thought, it was more of a stepping stone. My wife and I had joined a dream interpret group, and we were encouraged to write down our dreams as they occurred. “Be as detailed as you can,” we were told.

I was thrilled. If there is one thing I enjoy, it’s making people believe me, and I like to exaggerate. Not a big exaggerations or  outright lies, mind you, just a little step out of sync, just enough so you can’t be sure if it’s true or not. If I can make people think “it could happen,” even for a moment then I have them, and nothing makes me happier. When I write, I always write with the effort of “it could happen” very much in mind and nothing, I guarantee you, nothing makes me happier.

  3 comments for “The Wishing Stone (The Eve Project, book 2) – a Review

  1. March 17, 2016 at 3:40 pm

    Thanks for taking part in the tour. I’m so glad you enjoyed ‘The Wishing Stone’! I loved it!

  2. Tegon
    March 17, 2016 at 4:25 pm

    Thanks for reviewing my book !!!

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